For Black History Month 2017 we are reposting some stories from our archive that remain as powerful today as when they were first written.

Back in 1999 when Headliners was know as Children's Express, we asked three generations about being black and British. They told us about the differences the years have made, but racism remained a constant.

Tallis Steele, 66, grew up in Jamaica and moved to Britain as a young woman in 1956

"My baby was kept apart from the white babies at a hospital and the manager said it wasn't really racism. But racism doesn't mean anything to me because God made us all. I cant believe in it. I know its there, but I don't really worry myself about it."

If black children are having problems at home and play up at school, teachers see them as disruptive. There's no understanding.

Kate Marshall, 43, is a drugs counsellor and youth worker who spent the first nine years of her life on Nevis

"When I came to London, there weren't any other black families in our road and our neighbours used to call us names and telephone the police when my dad did work on the roof. They said they were being burgled.

I had an accent and even the way I wrote was different. I was told it was wrong and people used to laugh after me."

Carlene Thomas-Bailey, 15, is a young journalist with Children's Express

"When I walk into a shop, the assistants look more closely at me because of my colour. If black children are having problems at home and play up at school, teachers see them as disruptive. There's no understanding. People I've known have had to change schools so many times.

I can talk to a black friend about dumplings and fried fish and mangoes, and shell know what I mean. And I would know that if someone was abusing me in the street, a black friend would stick by me, no matter what."

This article was produced by Delwar Hussain, 18, Erica Rutherford, 18, Caroline Abomeli, 17, Stuart Fletcher, 17, Anna Chandwari, 16, Lizzie Kenyon, 15, Kierra Box, 14, Koiya Donovan, 13, Niall Payne, 12, and Benjamina Avro, 12.

This was published in Local Government Voice Solo in 1999.